AMD Ryzen 5 1600X CPU Review

    It's time to get excited about desktop PCs again as AMD takes the fight to Intel with its new range of Ryzen processors. Here's our AMD Ryzen review.

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    AMD Ryzen 5 1600X CPU Review

    AMD Ryzen 5 1600X is ambitiously aligned with Intel’s Core i5-7600K. It comes with 6 SMT-enabled cores. With such powerful processor it is able to operate on 12 threads in parallel.

    It features 16MB of L3 cache, a 3.6 GHz base clock rate, and a 4 GHz boost frequency. It includes the dual-core 4.1 GHz extended Frequency Range setting. It contributes to an all-core 3.7 GHz boost level for heavily-threaded workloads.

    AMD Ryzen 5 1600X’s idle power consumption is much higher than expectation. Overall, the trimmed-down design boosts similar power consumption as the eight-core Ryzen 7s.

    AMD Ryzen gives a budget chip set for hardcore gamers. It gives very high price to performance ratio. It challenges Intel’s Kaby lake based chip set. Six nimble cores shows full AMD’s budget-oriented eight-core model.

    ryzen

    The Ryzen 5 series is led by the Ryzen 5 1600X, a six-core part priced at $249. AMD claims that the 1600X comprehensively beats the Core i5-7600K in all the software that matters to PC gamers and pro-users and even punches above its weight against the i7-7700K.

    AMD made the Ryzen 5 1600X by disabling 2 out of 8 CPU cores physically present on the 14 nm “Summit Ridge” chip, which is, in turn, one core per quad-core complex (CCX), while leaving L3 cache untouched.

    So, you have a staggering 16 MB of shared L3 cache and 512 KB of L2 cache per core. The chip is clocked at 3.60 GHz, with 4.00 GHz of TurboCore frequency and the XFR (extended frequency range) feature unlocking further automated overclocked speeds depending on the efficacy of your CPU cooling. Its main competitor from the Intel stable is the Core i5-7600K.

    Ryzen 5 Market Segment Analysis
    Pentium G4560 Core i3-7100 Core i5-7400 Core i5-7500 Ryzen 5 1500X Core i5-6600K Core i5-7600K Ryzen 5 1600X Ryzen 7 1700 Core i7-6700K Core i7-7700K Ryzen 7 1700X
    Cores / Threads 2 / 4 2 / 4 4 / 4 4 / 4 4 / 8 4 / 4 4 / 4 6 / 12 8 / 16 4 / 8 4 / 8 8 / 16
    Base Clock 3.5 GHz 3.9 GHz 3.0 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.2 GHz 3.4 GHz
    Max. Boost N/A N/A 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz 3.9 GHz 3.9 GHz 4.2 GHz 4.1 GHz 3.7 GHz 4.2 GHz 4.5 GHz 3.8 GHz
    L3 Cache 3 MB 3 MB 6 MB 6 MB 16 MB 6 MB 6 MB 16 MB 16 MB 8 MB 8 MB 16 MB
    TDP 54 W 51 W 65 W 65 W 65 W 91 W 91 W 95 W 65 W 91 W 91 W 95 W
    Process 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm 14 nm
    Socket LGA 1151 LGA 1151 LGA 1151 LGA 1151 AM4 LGA 1151 LGA 1151 AM4 AM4 LGA 1151 LGA 1151 AM4
    Price $65 $120 $190 $205 $190 $240 $240 $250 $320 $340 $350 $400

     

    Specs

     

    Number of CPU Cores  6
     Number of Threads  12
    Base Clock Speed  3.6 GHz
     Max Turbo Core Speed  4GHz
     Total L1 Cache  576KB
     Total L2 Cache  3mb
     Total L3 Cache  16 mb
     CMOS  14nm
     Package  AM4
     Thermal Solution  Not Included
     Default TDP / TDP  95W
     MEMORY INTERFACE

    Memory Channels

    DDR4

    2

     

    The “Zen” Architecture

    The oldest reports about AMD working on the “Zen” architecture date back to 2012, when AMD re-hired CPU core designer Jim Keller, credited with the original winning K8 and K9 architecture designs, to work on a new core architecture to succeed “Bulldozer.”

    AMD continued to invest in the “Bulldozer” IP in the form of incremental core updates, hoping that trends in the software industry towards parallelization could improve, giving it a big break in price/performance.

    Those trends, in the form of DirectX 12 and Vulkan 3D APIs being multi-core friendly, came in a tad late (towards late 2016). Four years of work by a team dedicated to its development, led by Jim Keller, resulted in the “Zen” core.

    archi

     

    Price and availability

    You can buy a Core i5-7600K for £224.99 from Overclockers UK.

    The Ryzen 5 1600X costs a bit more: £248.99, also from Overclockers UK.

    That’s £1 less than the RRP: it’s brand new, so don’t expect to see any discounted prices for a while.

    Here’s a summary of the Ryzen 5 range to show you how the 1600X compares with its siblings:

    Model Cores / Threads Base Clock (GHz) Boost Clock (GHz) TDP (Watts) Included Cooler Price
    Ryzen 5 1600X 6 / 12 3.6 4.0 95 N/A £249 / $249
    Ryzen 5 1600 6 / 12 3.2 3.6 65 Wraith Spire £219 / $219
    Ryzen 5 1500X 4 / 8 3.5 3.7 65 Wraith Spire £189 / $189
    Ryzen 5 1500 4 / 8 3.2 3.4 65 Wraith Spire £169 / $169

     

    Pros:

    1. Strength in heavily threaded workloads
    2. Superior price-to-performance ratio for budget workstations
    3. Unlocked ratio multiplier

    Cons:

    1. High price relative to Core i5-7600K
    2. Lower overclocking headroom
    3. Overheating after long use

     

    Although a little more expensive than the i5-7600K, it’s easy to see that the Ryzen 5 1600X is better value for demanding tasks such as 3D- and video rendering, video editing and compressing and decompressing files.

    Overall it’s a high end performance for a true gamer. Ignoring the temperature issues, it will give you an extreme experience of a gaming.

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